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Arthur Golding on the Psalms

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ARTHUR GOLDING (c. 1536 – 1606) is today known chiefly from his remarkable translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, still admired today and which Ezra Pound once called the most beautiful book in the English language.  Golding, ablest translator of his age, produced other works as well.  One was a translation of John Calvin’s Commentaries on the Psalms, to which Golding attached his own “dedicatory epistle” from which the following excerpt is taken taken. (Note: spelling has been modernized.):

To The Right Honorable And Very Good Lord, Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, Lord Great Chamberlain Of England, Vicount Bulbecke, Etc.

I beseech your good Lordship to peruse this present book, which doubtless, for the excellency thereof, not only deserveth more singular commendation than man’s wit is able to yield, but also is worthy too be had continually in all mens hands, or rather too be printed in their hearts. For if you have an eye to the Authors, it was written by Prophets, Priests, and Kings, inspired with the Holy Ghost, the fountain of all understanding, wisdom, and truth, and avouched unto us by Christ, the Son of the everlasting God. Or if you have an eye to the matter, it containeth a treatise of the Doctrine of life and everlasting Salvation, the particulars whereof are as many as are the points of true Religion and holiness to Godward, or the points of faithful meaning and honest dealing to manward. And these things are common to it with the residue of holy Scripture.

The thing that is peculiar to it, is the manner of the handling of the matters whereof it treateth. For whereas other parts of holy writ (whether they be historical, moral, judicial, ceremonial, or prophetical) do commonly set down their treatises in open and plain declarations; this part consisting of them all, wrappeth up things in types and figures, describing them under borrowed personages, and oftentimes winding in matters by prevention, speaking of things to come as if they were past or present, and of things past as if they were in doing, and every man is made a bewrayer of the secrets of his own heart. And forasmuch as it consisteth chiefly of prayer and thanksgiving, or (which comprehendeth them both) of invocation, which is a communication with God, and requireth rather an earnest and devout lifting up of the mind, than a loud or curious utterance of the voice: there be many unperfect sentences, many broken speeches, and many displaced words, according as the voice of the party that prayed was either prevented with the swiftness of his thoughts, or interrupted with vehemency of joy or grief, or forced to surcease through infirmity, that he might recover new strength and cheerfulness, by interminding God’s former promises and benefits.

Notwithstanding, the obscurity of those places is not so great but that it may be easily overcome, by such as, when they pray, doo utterly sequester their minds from all earthly imaginations and fleshly conceits, and after a sort forsaking their bodies for the time, do mount up above the world by faith, and present themselves before the heavenly throne of grace, to seek the unspeakable and inestimable comfort of their souls.

I haven’t yet located a scanned version of thje original 1571 version.  The above comes from an 1845 translation of Calvin’s Psalms commentary by Rev. James Anderson that included Golding’s dedication.

Sources

Calvin, John (author); Anderson, James (translator). Commentary on the Book of Psalms. Vol 1. Edinburgh, 1845. (pp. xxiv-xxxiv)

Calvin, John (author); Golding, Arthur (translator).  The Psalmes of Dauid and others. With M. John Caluins Commentaries. London, 1571.

 

Written by John Uebersax

September 30, 2016 at 10:26 pm

A Beautiful Mind: Joseph Addison’s Religious Essays

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EADERS of this blog may download a free copy of my new book, a collection of religious and metaphysical essays by Joseph Addison which appeared in the The Spectator in 1711 and 1712. These are certain to delight and edify.  Addison is well known as one of the most skilled prose stylists in the English language; but few today are aware of the sublime quality of his religious essays.

Addison’s influence on both the English and American minds is considerable, yet largely unacknowledged today.

Download the ebook in pdf format here.

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Edward Young’s Night Thoughts – A New Edition for Modern Readers

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fancy_dropcase_NIGHT THOUGHTS by Edward Young (1683—1765) might easily be the greatest English literary work of the last 300 years.  A masterpiece judged by any standard, it rivals the works of Shakespeare and Milton and exceeds those of Young’s better-known contemporary, Pope. It is testimony to the infidelity of the modern age the neglect into which this great work has fallen.

Its topics?  Ones of greatest moment and timeless concern: Life, Death, Eternity, heaven-sent Philosophy, and the true meaning of the Delphic maxim, Know Thyself.

Young published Night Thoughts in nine installments or Nights.  The present new edition, with an introduction and notes for modern readers, supplies the first four Nights — originally conceived by Young as a complete work, and which supply the work’s main lines of thought. For a limited time an advance copy of the new edition is available for free here.

The topic, the motives, and the poetic skill of Young are magnificent.  The work is inspired, and one of the great jewels of English literature, not to be missed.flower